Women's Lunch, June 14th, 2016

 

In honor of Women and Prime of Life Brain Disease Research, CurePSP recently brought together the most eminent investigators and accomplished women to discuss the latest developments in neurodegenerative research.

FROM LEFT; Dr. Klein, Dr. Temple, Dr. Myeku, Dr. Fleisher, Dr. Bowles, Dr. Liu, and Dr. Nuriel.

Moderated by Tal Nuriel, PhD, the lunch took place in New York and saw presentations from Alison Goate, PhD, Mo Liu, PhD, Sally Temple, PhD, Natura Myeku, PhD, Kathryn Rosemary Bowles, PhD, and Jori Fleisher, MD. All of these women are recognized leaders in their fields, and all are doing amazing things in neurodegeneration research.

 

The presentations were organized along four lines of approach. Dr. Temple and Dr. Liu discussed their groundbreaking work of building mini-organs from pluripotent stem cells taken from PSP patient samples with which they can observe the development of the disease and test experimental drug effectiveness.

Dr. Fleisher spoke of her incredible work of revolutionizing caregiving and caring for the caregivers. Her projects have created a roadmap of scientifically proven, successful implementations of new methods of treating the people who are affected directly and indirectly with neurodegenerative diseases.

 

Dr. Goate and Dr. Bowles presented their work of studying genetic causations and susceptibilities to PSP. Dr. Goate is a fellow of the American Association of the Advancement of Science, and Dr. Bowles is an acclaimed geneticist.

 

CurePSP Spokesperson Kathryn Leigh Scott second from left, with, from left to right, Marcia Roma, Julie Halston, and Pamela Oswwski.

Dr. Myeku is a CurePSP grantee and a published scientist whose identification of FDA-approved drugs that could open the door for use as treatments for tau protein diseases such as PSP appeared in Nature Medicine in 2016.

 

The lunch was an opportunity for people with a connection to PSP to meet the scientists working on the front lines of neurodegenerative research, and personally get to know the people working to find treatment and cure for PSP and related prime of life brain disease.